Red Meat and the Risk of Colon Cancer

23 September, 2019 , , , , ,

SOSCuisine: Vegetarian Meal Plans

Why does eating red meat increase the risk of cancer?

Red meat may contain chemical compounds that form during processing or cooking. For example, carcinogenic chemical compounds such as N-nitroso compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are formed during meat processing. The cooking of meat also produces heterocyclic aromatic amines as well as other chemical compounds, including PAHs, which can also be found in other foods and in air pollution. Some of these chemicals are known or suspected carcinogens, but even so, it’s not yet clear how red meat increases the risk of cancer.

In conclusion, reducing red meat and processed meats can contribute to reducing the risk of cancer, and it is also beneficial for heart health and for the environment. There is no need to eliminate all red meat from your diet, but increasing your intake of plant-based foods can certainly be helpful. We invite you to explore more plant protein options such as soy and legumes, you might be pleasantly surprised!

To help you, here are some ideas for vegetarian recipes:

Chili Sin Carne

Chili sin carne

Chili sin carne

See the recipe >>

Cheese-topped Mushrooms and Lentils

Cheese-topped Mushrooms and Lentils

Cheese-topped Mushrooms and Lentils

See the recipe >>

Quick and Easy Falafel

Quick and Easy Falafel

Quick and Easy Falafel

This recipe recalls the traditional falafel, but can be prepared in just a few minutes.

See the recipe >>

Quick Tofu and Vegetable Stir-Fry

Quick Tofu and Vegetable Stir-Fry

Quick Tofu and Vegetable Stir-Fry

See the recipe >>

Tofu and Rice Bowl with Vegetables

Tofu and Rice Bowl with Vegetables

Tofu and Rice Bowl with Vegetables

See the recipe >>

Also, don’t hesitate to check out SOSCuisine’s vegetarian meal plans.


References

  • Bradbury, Murphy et Key (2019) Diet and colorectal cancer in UK Biobank: a prospective study. International Journal of Epidemiology; (Sous Presse).
  • Bouvard et coll. (2015) Carcinogenicity of consumption of red and processed meat. Lancet Oncol;16:1599–600.
  • World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (2018) Diet, Nutrition, Physical Activity and Colorectal Cancer. Continuous Update Project Expert Report. dietandcancerreport.org
  • Vieira et coll. (2017) Foods and beverages and colorectal cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis of cohort studies, an update of the evidence of the WCRF-AICR Continuous Update Project. Ann Oncol; 28:1788–802.
  • Organisation Mondiale de la Santé (2015) Cancérogénicité de la consommation de viande rouge et de viande transformée. https://www.who.int/features/qa/cancer-red-meat/fr/

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Author

Kathryn Adel

Kathryn Adel

Kathryn completed degrees in kinesiology and nutrition, as well as a Masters in Sports Nutrition. She is a member of OPDQ and of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. She ran track and cross-country at a national level. Kathryn specializes in sports nutrition, weight loss, diabetes, as well as heart and gastrointestinal health. Kathryn is experienced with the low FODMAP diet and she completed the Monash University low FODMAP dietitian’s training.

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